PUBLIC PROCUREMENT NEWS

  

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New EU guidance for procuring greener road lighting

20 December 2018

On 10 December, the European Commission released new guidance for greening public procurement of road lighting equipment, covering new installations and retrofits. The guidance also covers traffic signals/lights. The recommendations are an update of the guidance developed a few years ago, and come in the form of practical criteria (EU GPP Criteria) which can be inserted into public calls for tender.

The environmental aspects covered by the new EU GPP criteria for road lighting are split into three areas: energy consumption, light pollution and lifetime. Procurement of traffic signals is considered separately, using criteria that are predominantly centred on life cycle costs. 1.3% of all electricity consumed in 2005 (by the EU25) was by road lighting installations - thus the use phase is the dominant impact category, according to life cycle assessment studies.

Complimenting the new guidance, a number of good practice cases from cities are available online, such as from Rotterdam (The Netherlands, Župa Dubrovačka (Croatia), and Jimena de la Frontera (Spain). More good practice examples are available from the website of the Premium Light Pro project. The new EU GPP Criteria will be available in all official EU languages in the coming months.

More information on the new guidance and other GPP related news can be found in the December edition of the GPP News Alert, a monthly newsletter providing news, good practice and stakeholder insights on GPP in the EU.

All EU GPP guidance can be found here.

Tackling climate change through Green Public Procurement (GPP)

18 December 2018

From electric buses to zero energy kindergartens, from recycled construction materials to organic catering services, city administrations worldwide are increasingly procuring innovative, low carbon solutions to help them deliver public services in the most sustainable way possible.

Globally, public procurement accounts for some 10-15% of GDP (WTO) - although this figure varies substantially according to country and market sector. This represents a huge degree of purchasing power, meaning that the procurement decisions which public administrations make can have a huge impact on the market – and help encourage that market to offer more sustainable goods and services.

A report by IFC (International Finance Corporation) analysed the potential for climate-smart investments across different sectors at city level. This highlights that almost all our purchasing actions have climate change impacts – whether this relates to the energy products consume, or CO2 emissions embedded in global supply chains. The most significant procurement sectors for cities include building and infrastructure construction/renovation, transportation (covering public fleets, public transportation services, as well as embedded transportation in the delivery of goods and services), food, energy, and energy consuming products. In all these sectors cities are helping to drive new technologies and solutions, by providing an invaluable launch market and helping suppliers achieve economies of scale.

Many cities across the globe – from Auckland to Tshwane, from Oslo to Seoul, from Buenos Aires to Montréal – are putting in place green or sustainable procurement strategies and policies aimed designed to harness the power of procurement to achieve a wide range of sustainability goals, such as climate change mitigation. The Global Lead City Network on Sustainable Procurement provides an international platform for cities to highlight their achievements and share their experiences.

Read the full report here.

GPP Project GreenS Finalist for Circular Economy Prize

13 December 2018

The City of Cadiz was nominated a finalist for the Spanish Local Good practices for the Climate Award, for their pilot-procurement "Green Electricity Supply for Cadiz Provincial Government", which was part of the European Project GreenS.

The Award is given by the Spanish Network of Cities for the Climate, and in its 7th edition recognized local good practices in six categories. The public recognition of forward thinking local authorities helps to promote climate action, mitigation and adaptation on a local level and beyond. The GreenS project in the city of Cadiz was a finalist in the Circular Economy category.

As part of the project, a new contract for electricity supply for public bodies in the City of Cadiz was awarded. The new contract meant a real breakthrough in the annual reduction of CO2 emissions, contributing to achieve government goals’ to combat climate change and ensure environmental protection. According to estimates, the project is saving 1.127 tons of CO2 emissions per year with no additional cost for the provincial administration.

The GreenS project was European project designed to focus the attention of public authorities to the Green Public Procurement (GPP), Life Cycle Cost of the products and Life Cycle Procurement analysis as part of their means to achieving the ambitious goals for exceeding the EU 20% CO2 reduction by 2020. The project concluded in the Summer of 2018.

To learn more about GreenS and Cadiz' procurement of green electricity head over to the project website.

 

To City and Urban Leaders: Seize this moment!

11 December 2018

If global CO2 emissions reach zero in thirty years, there is a one-in two chance of limiting warming to 1.5°C. If the world fails to meet the 1,5°C target, human and ecological systems will reach the limits of their adaptive capacity, triggering the disruption of basic economic activity. This was found in the recently published IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5° (SR1.5) highlighting the significance of the 1.5° threshold. Accomplishing the complex task of emission reduction requires tremendous changes in energy production and use, land use and ecosystems, urban and infrastructure, and industry.

The IPCC published a special Summary report for Urban Policy makers, because urban areas are a key player in climate change adaptation and mitigation.

The summary calls for engaged officials and stakeholders who can influence urban economies, urban form and infrastructure, the connectivity between urban and rural areas, and behavioural choices in support of the sustainable urban transition. This transition is also enabled by sharing knowledge, adapt and replicate experience of successful implementation through membership in international city networks such as ICLEI, Procura+, and GLCN.

Examples for solution approaches are also listed in the summary and range from:

·         Energy efficiency in buildings through for example design of zero carbon homes;

·         Further uptake of green infrastructure through nature-based solutions;

·         Sustainable urban design such as the compact city model and pedestrianisation of centres;

·         Industrial-urban symbiosis towards material recycling and reuse at the city-regional level;

·         Decentralized energy grid i.e. micro grids.

Projects like the EU project SPP regions have demonstrated that powerful tools such as innovation procurement of sustainable, low carbon solutions can reduce CO2 emissions significantly. It takes forward thinking officials to implement these practices in their cities and reach a zero carbon world.

Read the full Summary report for Urban Policy Makers here.

Catalan Regional Tender Results in Low Emission Vehicle Fleet

6 December 2018

“Meeting the goals of the Paris Agreement could save about a million lives a year worldwide by 2050 through reductions in air pollution alone.” This is the main finding of a WHO report released this week at the occasion of the COP24 currently taking place in Katowice (Poland). One of the most dangerous and costly public health threats, air pollution in urban areas is one of the top policy priorities in the EU and worldwide.

Cities themselves can be part of the solution by purchasing low emission vehicles. Only a year ago the fleet for service and police vehicles of the Catalan Association of Towns and Counties consisted of 95% diesel vehicles, which contribute significantly to poor air quality. Thanks to a new framework agreement awarded in 2018, 308 new vehicles were purchased, over 80% of which are low or zero emission vehicles.

The call for tender for the new framework contract was developed as part of the European project SPP regions, which promoted the creation and expansion of European regional networks of municipalities working together on sustainable public procurement (SPP) and procurement of innovation. Collaboration among the public bodies sends a stronger signal of demand for sustainability and innovation to suppliers and help local authorities achieve ambitious sustainability targets.

Read the full case study here.

More inspiring examples of how public procurement can promote health and air quality can be found in our Resource Centre.

At the cross-roads: take the right turn towards electric buses

4 December 2018

This week, all eyes are on Katowice (Poland) and the Climate Change Conference COP24, where countries have to agree on how they will achieve the the goal of minimizing climate change to less than 2°C warming, decided three years earlier at COP21 in Paris. In his opening address Antonio Guterres (UN Secretary-General) highlights which steps need to be taken immediately to get closer to reaching this goal – one of them is the electrification of transport, which accounts for a large share of greenhouse gas emissions and contributes to dangerously poor air quality in cities.

A new report titled “Electric buses arrive on time“ (Transport & Environment), examines the transition towards sustainable, low carbon transport through public procurement. It maps out the shift from diesel powered to electric busses in Europe. “In 2017, the number of electric bus orders more than doubled - from 400 in 2016 to more than 1,000. In 2018, the market share is estimated to be around 9%, marking the transition from niche to mainstream and the beginning of a steep and necessary uptake curve.”

Electric buses already offer a better total cost of ownership (TCO) than diesel buses when external (public health) costs are included. Beyond costs, electric buses offer many additional benefits compared to their fossil fueled counterparts: superior image and comfort, no stranded assets from investing in gas infrastructure, using locally produced (renewable) energy and ensuring energy sovereignty by replacing oil consumption.

The earlier cities transition to a zero emission bus fleet, the better.

However, there are challenges to implementation, for instance coping with the higher capital costs of zero-emissions buses. Lucien Mathieu, author of the report and transport and e-mobility analyst at T&E, has a solution for that, too: “a grant could be made available through the new EU budget from 2020. This should be complemented by a Europe-wide zero emission sales target for new buses.”(Euroactiv)

For inspirational examples of zero emission public procurement, visits the website of ICLEI led European project BuyZET, in which cities use procurement of innovative solutions for zero emission urban delivery of goods and services.

For more case studies on the topic of clean urban transport, head over to our resource centre.

New EU GPP Criteria – focusing on indoor cleaning services

29 November 2018

The European Commission's DG Environment has released new Green Public Procurement (GPP) criteria for indoor cleaning services, which aim to make it easier for public authorities to purchase cleaning goods and services with reduced environmental impacts.

By focusing on cleaning services, the new EU GPP Criteria recognise that the key life cycle impacts of cleaning services relate to the energy consumed in providing the service, and the frequency and quality of the service, in addition to the chemical and production impacts linked to cleaning products.

The criteria are designed to be easily integrated in part or fully into any public authority's tender documents with minimal editing, and are closely aligned to the requirements of the EU Ecolabel, therefore making verification easier for procurers.

A webinar introducing the new criteria will be held on the 18 December 14.00 - 15.30. To register, visit the ICLEI registration page.

Circular Procurement - taking a bold step for sustainability

26 November 2018

A recently published report titled ‘Building circularity into our economies through sustainable procurement’, (UNEP) explores how to integrate circular economy in public procurement. The report highlights the power of institutional purchasing and advocates for circular procurement as a tool that advances the sustainability goals.

The report outlines two pillars of implementing circular public procurement and provides guidance for public authorities on how to put them into action: 

Pillar 1 - Promoting circular supply chains by procuring more circular products, materials and services - such as using circular procurement criteria in tender specifications.

Pillar 2 - Promoting new business models based on innovative and resource-efficient solutions - such as adopting supplier take-back systems

These strategies need to be enabled by cooperating with other organizations or new legal instruments that favour circularity in value-chains. For purchasing units wishing to get started, the report provides lessons such as ‘start with easy wins’ or ‘engage suppliers at an early stage’.

Additional powerful drivers to advance the inclusion of circularity in procurement practices are setting ambitious targets - as cities around the world did as part of the Global Leads City Network on Sustainable Public Procurement (GLCN), as well as knowledge sharing and actively contributing to international initiatives such as Procura+.

The report draws from previous work by, among others, the EU and ICLEI, showing that circular public procurement is already applied by forward thinking public bodies. There are many good practice cases to learn from, which you can explore in our Resource Centre

Read the full report here.

UrbanWINS CityMatch activity to focus on sustainable procurement

22 November 2018

Applications to the 3rd exchange of the UrbanWINS CityMatch Programme are now open. The activity will be hosted by the City of Malmö (Sweden) from 6-8 March 2019 and will focus on contract management for strategic and sustainable public procurement. Participants in this exchange will discuss, together with contract managers from Malmö purchasing cleaning and transport services, about market analysis before tender and will go through the criteria for the evaluation of tenders.

The UrbanWINS City Match Exchange Programme is open to politicians, policymakers, procurement officials, environmental and utilities service providers, and waste managers, amongst others. The goal of the programme is to bring people together to share knowledge, experience and working methods on sustainable and innovation procurement on the waste and resources sector. Participants in the first UrbanWINS CityMatch had the opportunity to convene in Rome (Italy) to discover how furniture circular procurement and Green Public Procurement monitoring work in practice. The second edition – applications are already closed – will take place next January in Zürich (Switzerland) and will shed light on the reuse of recycled concrete.

UrbanWINS is a three-year EU-funded project that aims at developing and testing methods for designing and implementing eco-innovative strategic plans for waste prevention and management in eight pilot cities: Cremona, Albano Laziale, Pomezia and Torino (Italy); Leiria (Portugal); Bucharest (Romania), and Manresa and Sabadell (Spain).

To apply to the 3rd UrbanWINS CityMatch Exchange Programme, visit here.

Procura+ Network China National GPP Study Visit 2018

20 November 2018

In October 2018, the China National Green Public Procurement (GPP) delegation conducted a 10-day learning visit to six Nordic cities. The delegation visited Copenhagen, Malmö, Gothenburg, Stockholm, Oslo, and Bergen - many of which are already Procura+ Participants. This visit was hosted by the Procura+ Network as the first international exchange event between the East Asian and European counterparts since the launch of Procura+ East Asia in May 2018.

The delegation consisted of six high-level officials from the Ministry of Finance, the China Quality Certification Center (CQC, a Procura+ strategic partner), Jilin Provincial Government, and China Finance and Economics Newspaper. The overall aim was to experience cutting-edge cases of  green procurement policies and practices. Nordic cities developed their GPP practices based on EU policy schemes, but have incrementally increased their standards in terms of sustainability. The well-established and sophisticated GPP mechanisms at respective Nordic cities are valuable for China GPP policy makers to refer to, contributing to the current research of establishing a national GPP scheme in China.

During the visit, Fangming Guo, Deputy Director General of the Treasury Department of China’s Ministry of Finance, shared an overview of the current GPP policy landscape, on-ground implementation, and the Government Procurement System Reform in China.  Furthermore, he shared insights toward the latest development and achievements in crafting an integrated government procurement legal system and advancing information release. The Nordic audiences appreciated and congratulated the rapid development and expansion in scope of GPP in China.

Established in 2003 by ICLEI, Procura+ is a network of public authorities around the globe to connect, exchange, act on sustainable, green and innovation procurement through meetings, seminars, and discussion forums, with Procura+ active in Europe and Procura+ East Asia active in East Asia. Managed by the ICLEI East Asia Secretariat with support from the ICLEI Global Sustainable Procurement Center, Procura+ East Asia supports local governments from China, Japan, Korea and Mongolia in achieving sustainable and low-carbon development goals through sustainable, green and innovation procurement.

In the photo:

China National GPP Delegation Visit Stockholm City Hall
Left to Right: Xiuli E, Director of Procurement Office, Jilin Provincial Finance Bureau; Zhigang Wang, Deputy Chief, China Quality Certification Center; Xiuqin Cheng, Secretary, China Quality Certification Center; Stefan Nordin, Chief Procurement Officer, Stockholm Municipality; Fangming Guo, Deputy Director General, Treasury Department, Ministry of Finance, China; Yaling Feng, Vice President of China Finance and Economics Newspaper