PUBLIC PROCUREMENT NEWS

  

NEWS SEARCH RESULTS ( 1 - 3 from 3 )

UN calls for urgent rethink as resource use skyrockets

11 April 2019

Rapid growth in extraction of materials is the chief culprit in climate change and biodiversity loss – a challenge that will only worsen unless the world urgently undertakes a systemic reform of resource use, according to a new report, prepared by the International Resource Panel and UN Environment.

Global Resources Outlook 2019 examines the trends in natural resources and their corresponding consumption patterns since the 1970s to support policymakers in strategic decision-making and transitioning to a sustainable economy.  According to the report, “the extraction and processing of materials, fuels and food make up about half of total global greenhouse gas emissions and more than 90 per cent of biodiversity loss and water stress”. More specifically, the use of metal ores increased by 2.7 per cent annually and the associated impacts on human health and climate change doubled during 2000-2015. Fossil fuel usage went from 6 billion tonnes in 1970 to 15 billion tons in 2017. Biomass increased from 9 billion tonnes to 24 billion tonnes – mostly for food, feedstock and energy.

The report argues that resource efficiency is essential, though not enough on its own. “What is needed is a move from linear to circular flows through a combination of extended product life cycles, intelligent product design and standardization and reuse, recycling and remanufacturing,” it says.

This transition can be accelerated through changes at the level of regulations, technical standards, planning and procurement policies that act to progressively lower resource intensity of economic activity while maintaining or improving the services or amenity provided. In the case of procurement, impact can be achieved through the application of green, socially responsible and circular policies at the specifications, criteria or clauses level. Get to know more through ICLEI's Sustainable Procurement Resource Centre.

If the recommended measures are implemented, it could accelerate economic growth, outweighing the up-front economic costs of shifting to economic models consistent with holding global warming to 1.5°C this century.

Read the full report here.

Read the summary for policy makers here.

Procurers, have your say about the 2014 Public Procurement Directives

8 April 2019

The European Committee of the Regions (CoR) and the Council of European Municipalities are conducting a consultation on the 2014 Directives on Public Procurement.

The 2014 Directives introduced a number of changes in the European legal framework for public procurement. These changes include new procedures to reduce red tape and provide easier access for SMEs, as well as stronger provisions on integrity and transparency, which target corruption and fraud, and a new focus on the role of public procurement in achieving policy goals in innovation, environmental protection and social inclusion.

Considering the key role of subnational governments in local public markets, through their spending on goods and services, construction and public works, the CoR has started to analyse the challenges and opportunities faced by regions and cities in implementing the new legal framework.

This consultation is being conducted by the Council of European Municipalities and Regions (CEMR) and the CoR. By responding to this survey, you will help to identify these key challenges and to gather the views of regions and cities on the types of policy needed to overcome them.

The CoR is expected to publish the survey results in May 2019 in a summary paper that will be circulated to all respondents. The results will also feed into the CoR opinion on the implementation of the 2014 Directives on public procurement

Find the consultation here.

Procurement Forum hits the 5,000 member milestone

3 April 2019

We are proud to share with you that ICLEI's Procurement Forum reached a new milestone: 5,000 members!


3,000 members ago, we called it a small village – it now has grown further into a small town. And what a town it is – with members from various countries, organisations and sectors.


On the forum, there are many different active groups discussing topics such as sustainable transport, social responsibility, EU GPP criteria, circular or innovation procurement. Also, it helps to keep track of relevant events related to procurement across sectors, for example, circular cities, ICT or health. It is a dedicated space for the exchange between procurers across public authorities and those interested in the topic.


We think it is a worthy occasion to appreciate the diversity of themes procurement is involved in and thank the active community driven to advance their work through exchange on innovation, sustainability and circularity.
Let’s keep it up and spread the word!

 

Join the Forum here.