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EU GPP case study: Sustainable procurement at the Natural History Museum of London, UK
The Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP), established as a UK independent not-for-profit company in 2000, has been working since 2010 with the Environment Agency (UK government agency responsible for protecting the environment and promoting sustainable development) on the LIFE+ funded programme European Pathway to Zero Waste (EPOW). The programme was developed to test different ways to cut waste in the South East of England. One of these projects has involved working with the Natural History Museum in London to improve sustainable procurement practices through targeting new contracts. Over a period of six months, the EPOW project helped embed sustainability considerations within the Museum’s procurement documents and processes. Procurement consultants worked with the Museum’s team to consistently articulate the Museum’s objectives through the policy and guidance information. Expert advice was also provided to improve a range of contracts and embed sustainability issues within future procurements. One of these contracts was the waste and recycling contract, which is for the effective management and disposal of a range of waste from the Museum’s public galleries, offices and laboratories, in accordance with the waste hierarchy. The Museum is in the process of appointing a new waste and recycling contractor to manage removal of waste. Inclusion of the sustainability recommendations in the waste and recycling contract procedures will allow the Museum to select a service provider that can help the Museum meet the waste and recycling targets set out in its Environmental Management System.
English
United Kingdom
European Commission - Directorate General Environment
2013
EU GPP case study: Green stationery and paper, Gloucestershire County Council, United Kingdom
In 2011, Gloucestershire County Council (GCC) signed a contract under a central government framework agreement for the supply of office stationery. Products supplied under the “Government Office Supplies Contract” are compliant with the UK Government’s Government Buying Standards , which are similar to the EU GPP criteria. The contract not only offers GCC a wider range of green products, but provisions made under the contract and by GCC’s Procurement Department make it more difficult for devolved purchasers to buy more costly and potentially non-compliant products from outside the Government Catalogue. Before entering into the contract, GCC undertook a series of measures to reduce unnecessary demand for stationery and reuse existing items. After collecting unused stock from around the Council, a month-long moratorium on buying stationery was imposed. This saved GCC around £29,000 (€34,000).
English
United Kingdom
Office stationery
European Commission - Directorate General Environment
2013
EU GPP case study: Recycled asphalt used for road surfacing in Hamburg, Germany
Using recycled material to refurbish roads usually only applies to the lower layers, using materials such as rubble from demolished buildings. Hamburg’s goal in this example was to recycle 100% of all materials during the resurfacing works on the City’s main street. The bitumen component therefore had to be recycled as well as aggregate materials. The City allowed a group of private companies who originally came up with the idea to test its use on roads not used by the public. After a series of tests, the City was reassured about the quality of the 100% recycling process. A restricted tender procedure was conducted and 5 companies made a bid. The contract was carried out successfully in 36 hours, keeping travel disruption to a minimum. The Municipality saved 30% compared to usual costs for road resurfacing, which equates to approximately €20,000.
English
Germany
Buildings and construction, Infrastructure
European Commission - Directorate General Environment
2013
EU GPP case study: Innovative and green bus shelters in Cornwall, United Kingdom
In early 2011, Cornwall Council began a project to improve the quality and sustainability of its transport infrastructure. An open procurement procedure was used for the design of sustainable bus shelters to be used across Cornwall and 10 organisations tendered for this opportunity. The use of a request for quotations (RFQ) was an innovative process for the council, who asked bidders to give method statements related to sustainability and low carbon design as part of this procedure. The 6 different bus shelter models designed by the successful bidder included the use of long life, engineered wood with PEFC, FSC and Cradle to Cradle Gold certification for the main structure. Surface coatings which allow the removal of graffiti with water rather than chemicals and the use of energy efficient LED lighting are amongst other green attributes. The manufacture of these shelters will soon be let as a 4-year framework contract.
English
United Kingdom
Infrastructure
Ecolabels,
European Commission - Directorate General Environment
2013
EU GPP case study: Urban regeneration of the Vila d’Este neighbourhood
The revitalization of the Vila D’Este neighbourhood follows the commitment made by Vila Nova de Gaia over the past few years to revitalize peripheral areas of the municipality. Vila D’Este is a densely populated neighbourhood, with approximately 17 thousand inhabitants. It is located in the parish of Vila de Andorinho, which lies within the municipality of Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal. The main objectives of the energy rehabilitation of this social housing complex are to meet current energy requirements, improve indoor air quality, and architecturally rehabilitate the neighbourhood.During the first phase of the project, 766 residences and 31 commercial spaces were rehabilitated, covering a total of 109 buildings. The second phase of the project is underway, which will allow the regeneration of 1319 residences and 45 commercial spaces. Following the improvements, namely the introduction of thermal insulation, improved glazing and installation of shading, the estimated annual energy savings expected from the overall measures are 10,3 GWh/year. The project has the potential to generate economic savings of approximately € 1.3 million/year. In environmental terms, the revitalization will allow a potential annual saving of 4 800 tons of CO 2 emissions.
English
Portugal
Buildings and construction
European Commission - Directorate General Environment
2013
EU GPP case study: Procurement of electric vehicles for public use in the city of Paris
The Autolib’ system is a follow-up to Paris’ Velib’ bicycle sharing scheme, launched in 2007. Autolib’ is a full electric public car- sharing service for customers and includes the deployment of an interconnected infrastructure of on-street stations for recharging batteries and parking vehicles. Although the City of Paris is the origin of the project, following its experiences in electric vehicles and the Velib’ scheme, it has partnered with 47 surrounding municipalities to ensure a service that can uniformly cover the Parisian metropolis. The scheme intends to deploy 3,000 all-electric cars for public use, initially based around 1,120 citywide parking and charging stations. As of December 2012, the Autolib’ fleet of vehicles has covered over 5,000,000 km since its launch 12 months earlier. This equates to a saving of nearly 630,000 kg of CO2 when compared to the use of a typical passenger vehicle. So far, 65,000 registered subscribers have access to more than 1,800 vehicles spread across more than 670 stations which include 3,900 charging points. These stations are also open for private individuals wishing to charge their electric vehicles.
English
France
Transport and vehicles
European Commission - Directorate General Environment
2013
EU GPP Case Study: Framework agreement for zero-emission vehicles in Oslo, Norway
Pursuing its objective of having a zero-emission vehicle fleet by 2015, the City of Oslo has concluded a framework agreement to replace a thousand cars and vans with environmentally friendly options in the years to come. The move feeds into the City’s “zero-emission technology” policy, established in 2010. A range of pre-procurement activities were undertaken by Oslo prior to setting up the framework agreement, which included a thorough testing phase of the new vehicles by their users, and extensive communication of the City’s policy for vehicles. The latter included a dialogue with all major suppliers about Oslo’s plans. As road transport contributes to 55% of overall direct emissions in Oslo, the current practice will put the City on the right path for meeting its climate policy goals.
English
Norway
Transport and vehicles
European Commission - Directorate General Environment
2013
EU GPP Case Study: Promoting life-cycle thinking in construction in Jyväskylä, Finland
In 2010 the City of Jyväskylä began the Jyväskyläan Optini project, which aimed at enhancing innovation and promoting life cycle thinking in procurement. The innovative procedure was piloted with the construction project of a school and day-care centre where specific targets for energy efficiency and sustainable development were included. Construction is expected to be completed by July 2015, and maintenance, management and refurbishment services will be provided by the contractor until 2033. The essential new element in life-cycle procurement was to transfer the risk of exceeding the agreed limits of energy consumption from the customer to the service provider. The limits for heating energy, electricity (excluding user electricity demand) and water consumption, as well as the payment terms and price risk for exceeding the limits, were established in the service contract. If, on the other hand, consumption is below the limits set, the savings are shared 50/50 between the customer and the service provider. Because of the latter, the contract encourages the use of the property as energy efficiently as possible.
English
Finland
Buildings and construction
Energy efficiency
European Commission - Directorate General Environment
2013
EU GPP case study: Greening internal finishings, University of Malta
Using greener materials for the internal finishing of a new building for the University of Malta recently involved tendering for goods including ceramic floor tiles, gypsum wall panels, window frames and paint works. The environmental criteria were based on a number of the EU GPP criteria – such as those available for hard floor coverings, wall panels and construction. The experience proved successful in terms of the market’s readiness to supply the products required without any problems. The results, however, have greater implications for the University’s GPP activities in general. Although experiences in GPP have been fairly limited, the University has come to recognise that the inclusion of green criteria in procurement does not necessarily translate into higher costs – which were previously perceived to be a hindrance to carrying out GPP. One of the most important developments in the framework of this project is the improved contact the University now has with the Ministry for Sustainable Development, Environment and Climate Change.
English
Malta
Buildings and construction
European Commission - Directorate General Environment
2013